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Contact

Office Location

440 Huntington Avenue
334 West Village H
Boston, MA 02115

Mailing Address

Northeastern University
ATTN: Peter Desnoyers, 202 WVH
360 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115

Research Interests

  • The integration of emerging storage technologies such as flash and SMR disk into existing software infrastructures
  • Algorithms for Flash storage
  • Shingled Magnetic Recording (SMR) disk drives
  • Teaching operating systems concepts

Education

  • PhD in Computer Science, The University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  • MS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • BS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Biography

Peter Desnoyers is an associate professor in the Khoury College of Computer Sciences at Northeastern, which he joined in 2008. Desnoyers received his PhD in Computer Science in 2007 from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, under Professor Prashant Shenoy. Prior to his doctorate, he had a fifteen-year engineering career at large companies such as Apple and Motorola and smaller startups. Desnoyers received his BS and MS degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 1988.

He is one of the founders and committee-members of the Massachusetts Open Cloud, a multi-institutional collaboration that develops new models for cloud computing. His research focuses on storage issues in operating systems, in particular, the integration of emerging storage technologies such as flash and SMR disk into existing software infrastructures.

Desnoyers is a member of the Industrial Advisory Board for the UMass Boston Department of Computer Science and was a visiting scholar at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He has chaired the IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies (MSST ’15) and the ACM Workshop on Interactions of NVM/Flash with Operating Systems and Workloads (INFLOW ’15). He is also an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Computers and has served on the program committees and editorial boards of acclaimed computer science conferences and journals.